Categories
Privacy of Data Windows

Windows 10 Activity History privacy settings

Windows 10 Activity History has local records of apps and services in use,  files that were opened, and visited websites.  This information may be periodically sent to Microsoft under the default options.  These settings can be changed and are found at Start Button > Settings > Privacy > Activity History.

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Facebook Privacy of Data

Facebook app will have more privacy features

Facebook will prompt its users to review their privacy settings within the next few weeks as part of a rollout of new and revised privacy features:

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Privacy of Data Security

Avast will end operations for Jumpshot because of user privacy concerns

Avast announced that they have decided to end operations for its subsidiary data analytics company Jumpshot because of public concerns about user privacy.  Avast’s free and paid antivirus software is used by millions of computer and mobile device users.

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Data Breaches Privacy of Data

Quest Diagnostics and LabCorp AMCA data security incident

Quest Diagnostics issued a statement that billing collections service American Medical Collection Agency (AMCA) had potential unauthorized activity on AMCA’s web payment page, which could have compromised the data of about 11.9 million Quest patients.  Lab results were not affected by this incident.  Quest Diagnostics is continuing their investigation.

Update: LabCorp also revealed in an SEC filing that AMCA also had 7.7 million of their customer records affected in a similar incident.

Categories
Data Breaches Privacy of Data Security

Data breach lists and identity theft victim resources

Some of the more comprehensive lists of known data breaches include:

Identity theft victims can receive advice from these websites:

Categories
Data Breaches Legislation Privacy of Data

Stanford Law School world map of Internet laws

Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society (CIS) has an interactive map that lists Internet legal developments around the world.  More information about this map can be found at the CIS map’s FAQ page.

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Apple iOS iPad iPhone Privacy of Data Security Smartphones

Apple disables FaceTime until security bug is fixed

Update: Apple released iOS 12.1.4 on February 7, 2019 to fix the FaceTime issue.   FaceTime is now available at the Apple System Status page.

USA Today and the Washington Post have reported that some iPhone FaceTime users have been able to listen to people they are calling before the call is answered.   FaceTime runs on iPhones and iPads running iOS 12.1 as well as Macs running macOS Mojave.

Apple is currently working on a fix for this security issue.   FaceTime has been temporarily taken down as noted on the Apple System Status page.

Categories
Privacy of Data Security

Companies that track U.S. consumer data

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), a U.S. government agency that enforces federal consumer financial laws, publishes a list of companies that track data of U.S. consumers.  The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) requires companies to give consumers copies of their personal data reports.

Some of the more relevant companies on this list include:

LexisNexis has a free personal report available which shows data compiled from various public sources.

An online dispute can be filed with Equifax, Experian, TransUnion, and LexisNexis if there are errors in a credit file.

Categories
Data Breaches Google Privacy of Data

Google expedites shutdown of Google+ consumer version

Google will move the shutdown date of the consumer version of its Google+ (Google Plus) social network from August 2019 to April 2019.  Google still plans to support Google+ for enterprise customers.

Update: Google+ will no longer be available for consumer (personal) accounts on April 2, 2019.  Google also provided instructions on downloading Google+ data and deleting a Google+ account.

This announcement was a follow-up to their October 2018 security notice on Google+.

Categories
Legislation Privacy of Data Smartphones

New DMCA government rules allow third party repairs of some technology products

The U.S. Copyright Office issued a new ruling effective October 28th 2018 that allows exceptions to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998 (DMCA).  Section 1201 of the DMCA was used by some companies to restrict consumer and third party use of products containing software, including smartphones, computers, motor vehicles, and home appliances. This ruling allows greater legal protection for consumers and third party companies to repair and diagnose rightfully owned technology products.

Answers to some frequently asked questions on this ruling can be found at www.copyright.gov/1201/2018/faqs.html.  General information on U.S. copyright laws is available at www.copyright.gov/help/faq/index.html.

Digital rights groups such as the Repair Association and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have issued their own responses regarding this ruling.